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[a] rich psychological reflection on fundamentally flawed subjects and the way in which they deal with loss. (…) In short, (…) a masterpiece.”

Introduction

Almost every cinematographical narrative that Nishikawa has crafted up until now – with Dear Doctor (2009) as exception – has concerned family and relations related to a family context. But on a more fundamental level, Nishikawa’s main focus has been the discrepancy subjects display between what is inside (uchi) and what is outside (soto).

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Yureru proves to be a very intimate emotive meditation on the mendacity of identity and the subjectivity in experiencing reality. It is a sublime meditation we recommend to everyone.”

Introduction

In 2006 Miwa Nishikawa released her second feature film Yureru. As her first feature film, Wild Berries (2003), for which Kore-eda was the producer, garnished many awards, like the Best New Director award at the 2004 Yokohama Film Festival and the 13th Japanese Professional Movie Awards, expectations were very high. With Yureru (2006), which won 4 awards at the Yokohama Film Festival, and Dear Doctor (2009), Nishikawa confirmed her status as a big talent in the industry. 

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