Alternative translated version 1:

Sakutarō Hagiwara
In “Howling at the Moon”

Cats

Black-as-can-be cats arrive a-pair,
Up on a rooftop, a plaintive eve,
And on the tips of their pointed tails hung
A wispy crescent-moon, looking hazy.
‘O-wah, good evening,’
‘O-wah, good evening.’
‘Waa, waa, waa.'[*infant crying]
‘O-wah, the man of this household is bedridden.’

Alternative translated version 2 (Nagano, 1989, p. 36):

Sakutarō Hagiwara
In “Howling at the Moon”
 
Cats
 
Coal-black cats, two of them,
on the roof of a sensual night,
from the tips of their taut,erect tails,
a thread-like crescent blurs.
“Owaa, good evening.”
“Owaa, good evening.”
“Ogyaa, ogyaa, ogyaa.”
“Owaaa, the master of this house is ill.”
 
Alternative translated version 3 (Hayes, 1996, p.31):
 
Sakutarō Hagiwara
In “Howling at the Moon”
 
Cats
 
Two jet black cats
high on the roof, on this bewitching night.
A threadlike crescent moon stands straight but dim
from the tips of their ramrod tails.
“Oo-waah, Good Evening”
“Oo–waah, Good Evening”
“Oo–gyaah, Oo–gyaah, Oo–gyaah”
“Oo–waah, the master of this house is sick.”
 
references:
 
Nagano, T. (1989). Introductory Notes to Howling at the Moon : An Essay for the Study of Hagiwara Sakutaro. 弘前大学近代文学研究誌. 3, 1989, p. 29-46.
 
Hayes, C. (1996). A Stray Dog Howling at The moon: A Literary Biography of Hagiwara Sakutaro (1886-1942). Doctoral dissertation. Volume 2.
 
 
 
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