FineBanner

Introduction

Even though Yosuke Fujita’s first film success dates from 1986, when he won the grand prize in the 8mm Torino Film festival with “Tora”, audiences had to wait till 2008 before he would release his first full-length feature film. During those “empty” years Fujita-san worked at the Otona keikaku, a comedy troupe founded by Suzuki Matsuo – another notable name originating from this troupe is Kankuro Kudo.

Continue reading

Lightshinesbanner

The light shines only there shows powerfully the difficulty as well as the power that is to be found in human relations and underlines, that, in fact, the light shines only there”

Introduction

Despite having only directed four cinematographical products – Sakai-ke no shiawase (2006) being her first, and a segment in Quirky Guys and Gals (2011), The Light Shines Only There (2014), her third full-length featurecemented Mipo O’s reputation as one of the most promising directors in Japan. Reason enough for Psycho-cinematography to review this narrative closely from a psychoanalytic perspective and see whether The Light Shines Only There (2014) truly deserves all the recognition it has received.

Continue reading

Kuroneko/Yabu no naka no kuroneko (1968) review

Kuroneko.png

Introduction

Any self-respecting cinematography enthusiast should know the name of Kaneto Shindo (1912-2012). As a director, he brought us narratives like Children of Hiroshima (1952), the naked Island (1960), and Onibaba (1964) and, as a screenwriter, he wrote dozen of scripts other well-known directors like Kon Ichikawa (1915-2008), Keisuke Kinoshita (1912-1998), Yasuzo Masumura (1924-1986), Fumio Kamei (1908-1987), Kōzaburō Yoshimura (1911-2000), and Tadashi Imai (1912-1991). As such, it is only logical that psycho-cinematography reviews masters of Japanese cinema, such as Kaneto Shindo. In this article we review his horror narrative Kuroneko (1986).

Continue reading

Foodfiles Nagoya: RedRock

FoodfilesN.png

Introduction

Can Nagoya really be considered “the most boring city in Japan”, as Philip Brasor ( 2016/10/08) puts it, or is this general thought about Nagoya making the city bleaker than it really is? We are convinced that the latter is the case. In our view, if your focus is either on regional cuisine, Japanese Tokugawa history or on (the history of) Japanese industry and technology, then Nagoya is a great place to visit.

dscf2533What concerns history, Aichi prefecture is the birth region of important historical characters like Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1536/37-1598), Oda Nobunaga (1534-1582) and Ieyasu Tokugawa (1543-1616). For everyone who wants to know more about Japanese history, places as Nagoya castle – enter at own risk, because the building could collapse in a strong earthquake – and the Tokugawa Art museum are a must see. More spiritual souls can calm their souls by visiting the Atsuta shrine, one of the three imperial shrines Japan offers. And car and technology enthusiasts will surely enjoy the Toyota Commemorative Museum of Industry and Technology.

But the most pleasing about Nagoya is knowing that after a hard day of using public transport, sightseeing and learning, one can feast on the many delicious dishes (like Misokatsu, Tebasaki and Unagidon) Nagoya offers. But instead of focusing on restaurants serving the traditional Nagoya dishes, I’ll introduce the meat restaurant Redrock.

Continue reading