Fires on the plain (2014) review.

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“As blood splatters around and flying limbs are flying too, the  narrative etches an unsettling and claustrophobic encounter with the demise of humanity.”

Introduction

Shin’ya Tsukamoto, who directed narratives like the cyberpunk horror narrative Tetsuo: the iron man (1989), Bullet Ballet (1998) and the surreal erotic-thriller A Snake of June (2002), is nothing else than a cult director. Well-known for this explicit depictions of violence – depictions aiming to reveal the violence and erotic feelings inherent to the subject, Tsukamoto decided to use the depictions of violence in Fires on The Plain for a different purpose: to reveal the horror of the war.

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種をまく人 (2016) レビュー (日本語)

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「竹内洋介。彼は明確なヴィジョンを持った映画監督であり、それを誠実に銀幕に描き出すことのできる才能を証明した。人間模様を描く彼の次回作を、我々は待ちきれない。」

導入

映画の物語が、有名な画家の芸術と人生に触発されることは、珍しいことだ。映画「種をまく人」の場合で言うと、オランダの画家・ヴィンセント・ヴァン・ゴッホの人生、より具体的に言えば「種をまく人」や「ひまわり」の絵画、これらの要素が一体化し、物語を竹内洋介に紡がせた。

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Bangkok Nites (2016) [Camera Japan Festival]

 

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“That is why, when all is said and done, the narrative of Luck and Ozawa, due to the lack of the cinematographical conciseness and thematic focus, is not able to truly touch and captivate the spectator.”

Introduction 

Even after wars are over, the scars left by the war are still visible. If you go to my country, Belgium, and visit the western corner of West-Flanders, the various graveyards of American, German, Canadian, …etc. and the left-overs of the bunkers are fixed reminders of the first world war. What concerns Thailand, the scars present there are reminders of their colonial history.

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Journey of the Tortoise (2016) Review [Camera Japan Festival]

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“With its refreshing cinematography, blended with a thoughtful and effective use of music [the narrative] (…) proves to be a very engaging, funny and downright crazy experience.”

Introduction 

With Journey of the Tortoise Tadashi Nagayama presents his first full-length feature based on his own experience surrounding the disappearance of a turtle he and his brother once had. Their father told them it ran away while he was cleaning the water tank, but Tadashi was dimly aware his father did not tell the truth.

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The Sower (2016) review [Camera Japan Festival]

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“Yosuke Takeuchi has prove(n) himself to be a director with a clear vision and the talent to sincerely paint his vision on the silver screen. We can’t wait for his second cinematographical adventure in the human interest genre.”

Introduction

It is not common for a cinematographical narrative to be inspired by the art and the life of a famous painter. In The Sower‘s case, Vincent Van Gogh and more specifically his paintings of sowing and sunflowers inspired Yosuke Takeuchi to create a narrative integrating these two elements so integral to Van Gogh’s oeuvre.

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Satoshi: A Move For Tomorrow (2016) Review [Camera Japan Festival edition]

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“And if we add Matsuyama Kenichi’s splendid performance to the mix, the already engaging narrative is turned into to be a very moving character study of Satoshi Murayama, but, above all, into a beautiful love-letter to the art of Shogi.”

Introduction

Shogi (Japanese Chess) might already have been featured in many manga and anime, but, given the popularity of Shogi in Japan and beyond, it might be surprising that it took so long for someone to create a biopic about a famous player (narra-note 1). With Satoshi: a move for tomorrow the wait is finally over. This narrative, based on the nonfiction novel Satoshi no Seishun (2000) by Yoshio Osaki, concerns the short life of Shogi prodigy Satoshi Murayama (06/15/1969 – 08/08/1998), who struggled with nephrotic syndrome from childhood onward and, finally, also with cancer.

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Over The Fence (2016) Review [Camera Japan Festival]

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It is not love-story in the traditional sense of the word, but a wonderful and moving psychological study of the concept of meeting, a sort of meeting that might change each subject involved forever.”

Introduction 

Nobuhiro Yamashita is already a well established name in the Japanese cinematographical field. People may know him from the highly entertaining Linda Linda Linda (2005), A gentle Breeze in the village (2006) and The Matsugane Potshot Affair (2007), for which he won the award for Best Director at the 32nd Hochi Film Award, and the Midnight Diner drama series – the first season can be watched on Netflix.

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