Battleswithouthonour

“[Battles proves to be] one of the most gripping and enthralling yakuza narratives ever made [and lets the spectator] enjoy the struggles [beyond any kind of heriosm] of the warring yakuza families of post-war Hiroshima”

Introduction

If one hears or reads the name of Kinji Fukasaku (深作欣二, 1930–2003), one irresistibly associates it with yakuza eiga – even though he tried his hand at other genres like the jidai-geki genre and ended his career with grossly entertaining Battle Royal (2000). The association with yakuza-eiga is, of course, no surprise at all. When, in the seventies, the popularity of the Toei’s formulaic ninkyô eiga [chivalry eiga] started to decline, it was the realistic approach, an approach he already used in the sixties, of Battles without honour and humanity that pioneered the Jitsuroku eiga sub-genre [actual record films].

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FineBanner

Introduction

Even though Yosuke Fujita’s first film success dates from 1986, when he won the grand prize in the 8mm Torino Film festival with “Tora”, audiences had to wait till 2008 before he would release his first full-length feature film. During those “empty” years Fujita-san worked at the Otona keikaku, a comedy troupe founded by Suzuki Matsuo – another notable name originating from this troupe is Kankuro Kudo.

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bannermaki

Introduction

Next up in our trip through Japanese erotic photography is the female photographer Maki Miyashita (宮下 マキ), who was born in 1975 in Kagoshima, Kyushu. Even though she started studying film at the Kyoto college of Art, her interest shifted to photography while working a part-time job at a film processing lab in Kyoto. After graduation, she began working as a professional photographer besides pursuing her interest in documentary photography.

Very early in her career, 1997 to be precise, she conceived the idea of her award-winning Rooms and Underwear [部屋と下着] photography project. Continue reading

Lightshinesbanner

The light shines only there shows powerfully the difficulty as well as the power that is to be found in human relations and underlines, that, in fact, the light shines only there”

Introduction

Despite having only directed four cinematographical products – Sakai-ke no shiawase (2006) being her first, and a segment in Quirky Guys and Gals (2011), The Light Shines Only There (2014), her third full-length featurecemented Mipo O’s reputation as one of the most promising directors in Japan. Reason enough for Psycho-cinematography to review this narrative closely from a psychoanalytic perspective and see whether The Light Shines Only There (2014) truly deserves all the recognition it has received.

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natba

To set the tone of this series of articles straight away: the Japanese culture does not exist. Despite many ‘scientific’ attempts, all under the banner of nihonjinron, to describe and prove the uniqueness of Japanese culture and its people, there is no unique Japanese essence, passed on from time immemorial, that units each and every Japanese subject. The idea that there is something like such essence is no more than a fiction, an imaginary narrative construction. By categorizing the Japanese essence as a narrative construction, we imply that there is a constructing force behind this fiction, this nihonjinron.

In this first article, we want to introduce nihonjinron in general terms. In future articles we aim to get a deeper understanding of this nihonjinron, to explain the aspects of construction, and to underline the fictionality of any nationalism.

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歌舞伎の導入 (culture introduction)

[These culture introductions are short introductions of Japanese cultural aspects written in easy Japanese.]

歌舞伎の導入

歌舞伎(かぶき)は、日本固有(にほんこゆう)の演劇(えんげき)で、17世紀(せいき)に始(はじ)まりました。歌舞伎(かぶき)は歌(うた)や踊(おど)りのある芝居(しばい)です。

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